Program Staff

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My goal is to make sure every ACT team member has the most valuable learning experience possible during their term-of-service. The way I see it, service can be a stepping stone to personal and professional growth that's hard to find in a classroom. Drawing from my background in community health research, program evaluation and public health I coordinate opportunities for professional development, help members apply service to their individual paths, and ensure our members have the foundational skills and knowledge they need to deliver high quality, empathetic and collaborative service to our community.

Chelsea Schmidt

Member Support Coordinator

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Lauren Meloche

Program Director

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As Training Operations Coordinator, I work closely with member teams to prepare them to carry out overdose rescue training sessions. As a recent graduate of Wayne State with a degree in Public Health and Political Science and an ACT alum, I am passionate about providing harm reduction services to high need areas in my community. 

Parker Tomkinson

Training Operations Coordinator

AmeriCorps Members

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My favorite part about being an AmeriCorps member is seeing that we have opened up people’s eyes and minds. It is so fulfilling to see people come to a training with the intent of wanting to save a life.

Tavie Valdez

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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I joined AmeriCorps to gain hands-on experience with an important health topic that impacts our community. My favorite part of ACT is getting to teach community members about Narcan and hands-only CPR. 

Daniel McLeskey

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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The best part about Americorps is being surrounded by truly remarkable people. Knowing I can work with such empathetic and passionate members gives me the drive I need to successfully continue in this program. 

Emad Kaid 

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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 I hope through the ACT program, I will be able to gain and provide my community as an Arab with the information, training and tools needed to stop overdose death and prevent future harm.

Abier Alahmadi

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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I’m looking forward to bonding with my cohort and contributing back to the community by facilitating trainings and promoting awareness regarding opioid use.

Anoosha Vemulapati

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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I joined AmeriCorps to make a direct, positive, long-lasting impact on our community. My favorite part of being an AmeriCorps member is meeting and learning from all the wonderful people that I serve with!

Hady Kobeissi

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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I want to learn how to reach the community. Service is something I want to do in the future, and learning how to engage with the community is a crucial step in that. I also want to learn more about the opioid crisis.

Ryan Peplinski

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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My favorite part of being an AmeriCorps member is that it gives me an opportunity to serve my community and really make a difference in other people’s lives. 

Salam Sulaiman

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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I heard a lot about the opioid epidemic and researched the War on Drugs in high school. It all seemed so important and pressing, and I wanted to get involved in any way I could instead of just feeling helpless. 

Suha Iqbal

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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By serving with cohort 12, I really want to help reduce the number of opioid overdoses in the area. I hope to gain experience in this field so I can further pursue an education in psychiatric nursing with a focus on substance use disorders.

Christina Foley

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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I joined AmeriCorps to help educate my community on the opioid crisis. Additionally, I want to expand on knowledge on opioids and their impact, and carry that experience with me to a future career in emergency medicine.

Christopher Conn

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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My favorite part of being an AmeriCorps member is that members have a lot of freedom in the service that you get to do. You are given guidelines, but you get to choose audiences to target and brainstorm the best methods to reach those audiences.

Olivia Carlisle

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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I am a part of a research study that aims to improve treatment outcomes for individuals with opioid use disorder and are on methadone/buprenorphine; through this research I gained more insight into how debilitating opioid dependency can be. I wanted to be a part of the solution.

Monya Ali

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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Bio coming soon!

Tiffany Moore

Overdose Rescue Trainer

Program Alumni

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I joined AmeriCorps because I wanted to make a difference and help save lives by increasing the number of trained community members equipped with Narcan. I also wanted to learn more about the Opioid epidemic and serve the community in a meaningful way. 

William Nolan

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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I joined AmeriCorps because I had heard a lot about the opioid epidemic and I wanted to learn more about it through first hand experiences and be a part of the solution. Also, being a Michigander my entire life, I wanted to give back to the communities that have harbored many of my lovely childhood memories.

Shaili Kothari

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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The reason that I joined is because I have a heart to see people saved from drug overdose and free of drug addiction.

Eugene Cole

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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Quentin Venney

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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The ACT Program has allowed me to explore my interests and work with others to raise awareness about opioid use disorder, Narcan, and harm reduction strategies.

Ayah Alghurabi

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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The reason I decided to join AmeriCorps is because I wanted to make a difference.

Kamrin Dean

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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I joined AmeriCorps to gain insight into how public health programming works! I hope to learn more about the history and people of the city of Detroit, and the unique health challenges it faces. I wish to connect with community leaders and members, spread ideas about the value of harm reduction, and prepare and build confidence in as many residents as I can to act.

Kristopher Janevski

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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I believe for me the best part about serving as an Americorp member has been the people I’ve met during my service so far. My Americorps term has allowed me to interact with community members and give back in a way that I didn’t think was possible! 

Husna Khan

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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I joined AmeriCorps because I wanted an experience where I was not only learning, but helping my community in the process.

Gagan Kaur

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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My favorite part of being an Americorps member is connecting with people and community groups all over metro Detroit. There’s so much support for the ACT program from the surrounding communities, and it’s an honor to be a part of it.

Gabrielle Schmidt

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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The reason I decided to join AmeriCorps is because I wanted to make a difference.

Paula Perry

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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The ACT Program has allowed me to explore my interests and work with others to raise awareness about opioid use disorder, Narcan, and harm reduction strategies.

Tristin Smith

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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My favorite part of the ACT Program is the encouragement that the staff has given me in exploring my own interests in relation to understanding the opioid epidemic. It has been very interesting to learn more about how the opioid epidemic is very interconnected to societal, cultural and medical issues within the USA.

Maheshram Madasamy

Overdose Rescue Trainer

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I joined Americorps to better understand the overdose epidemic and immerse myself further into the community I grew up in so that as a physician I can better treat and understand patients’ backgrounds as well.

Dorothea McGowan